Download Biomass Part A: Cellulose and Hemicellulose by Willis A. Wood, Scott T. Kellogg PDF

By Willis A. Wood, Scott T. Kellogg

This quantity covers cellulose and hemicellulose and contains confirmed and reproducible equipment for study concerning the conversion of carbohydrate polymers to usable monomeric devices. Sections at the training of biomass fabrics and of substrates are integrated, as are sections on analytical tools and at the purification and assay of enzymes

Show description

Read or Download Biomass Part A: Cellulose and Hemicellulose PDF

Similar biochemistry books

Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry, Volumes 116-202

Lehninger rules of Biochemistry, Fourth version brings readability and coherence to a frequently unwieldy self-discipline, whereas incorporating the field's most vital fresh advancements and purposes.

Subcellular Biochemistry: Volume 6

This quantity maintains the culture of SUBCELLULAR BIOCHEMISTRY of attempting to holiday down interdisciplinary boundaries within the learn of phone functionality and of bringing the reader's realization to much less good studied, yet however beneficial, organic structures. we begin with an in depth article through T. P. Karpetsky, M.

Extra resources for Biomass Part A: Cellulose and Hemicellulose

Sample text

9 Separation of cellodextrins, which are homologous compounds of slightly different molecular dimensions, weight, and melting point (Table I), is a challenge. Microscale separation has been achieved by thin-layer chromatographic processes but larger scale separation preferentially uses liquid chromatography. Suitable chromatographic packings include charcoal and Celite, 2A3,14 charcoal and cellulose, 12 polyacrylamide and dextran, 2°-22 silica23,24DEAE-Spheron 300, 25 and cation-exchange resin in the Ca 2÷ form.

Chem. 10, 55 (1957). 13 G. L. Miller, J. Dean, and R. Blum, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 91, 21 (1960). 14 G. L. Miller, Methods Carbohydr. Chem. 3, 134 (1963). 15 K. Hess and K. Dziengel, Ber. Dtsch. Chem. Ges. B 68, 1594 (1935). 16 E. E. Dickey and M. L. Wolfrom, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 71, 825 (1949). 17 M. L. Wolfrom and J. C. Dacons, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 74, 5331 (1952). 18 M. L. Wolfrom and A. Thompson, Methods Carbohydr. Chem. 3, 143 (1963). 19 M. Voloeh, M. R. Ladisch, M. Cantarella, and G. T. Tsao, Biotechnol.

Fukuyama, and T. Kuge, Carbohydr. Res. 121, 163 (1983). METHODS IN ENZYMOLOGY,VOL. 160 Copyright© 1988by AcademicPress, Inc. All rightsof reproductionin any formreserved. -. 6 eq 0 0 r-: - 28 CELLULOSE [4] having predominantly endocellulolytic activity are required and fractionation of large quantities of this cellulolytic complex is difficult. 12and later modified by Miller e t a l. 13,14Acetolysis followed by deacetylation is an alternative method. ~9 Separation of cellodextrins, which are homologous compounds of slightly different molecular dimensions, weight, and melting point (Table I), is a challenge.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.36 of 5 – based on 34 votes